the start of something

this is the blog of Cody William Smith, also known as CodySLR. Photographer and DP based in Los Angeles, California. This blog is for sharing. Photographs and Words © 2014 Cody Smith All Rights Reserved

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VIRGINIA CITY, NEVADA
This is another on of my best friends Cody Smith (codyslr) he is always down to get shit done and he shoots film like a boss. I feel extremely fortunate to have been able to witness him grow into an extremely talented photographer and i look forward to seeing everything he creates. If it wasn’t for this guy i probably wouldn’t be working so damn hard all the time.

So after that long description i suppose this is the second photo of my catalog of portraits of the people closest to me.
Enjoy. 
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Fuller Lake, California
I love having my film developed to find photographs I had forgotten about. This is from a snow-camping adventure in which we most certainly should have gotten completely stuck, because we went during a snow storm. The next morning Travis dragged my Subaru Impreza behind him with his truck (loaded down with a camper) through a 1/2 mile of deep snow. We ended up digging out a 10’x10’ section of a berm to escape, but otherwise we made it just fine.
by Cody William Smith
instagram | flickr | prints
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Just outside Rosamond, California 
These are posting photographs from my recent 475-mile bicycle tour from Reno, NV to Los Angeles
At approximately 6:30pm of the 5th day, after stopping to eat, rest and hydrate ourselves, we left a gas station near Rosamond to ride the final 30 miles to Red Rocks Canyon State Park. The sun was already behind the massive mountains to the west, and we rode until well after dark. We cruised in the middle of the night on the suspiciously busy desert highway; no street lights, no moon, and a very thin shoulder. We rode on like this for 25 miles.
Sometimes I would take a long sloping turn out into the middle of the midnight highway, illuminated only by my small bike light and those of my companions. I would ride as fast as I could, gazing out toward the millions of stars that comprise the Milky Way. I was trying my best to make something else of the seemingly endless, and very dangerous 20 mile ride to camp. It worked.
by Cody William Smith
instagram | flickr | prints
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Just outside Rosamond, California 
These are posting photographs from my recent 475-mile bicycle tour from Reno, NV to Los Angeles
At approximately 6:30pm of the 5th day, after stopping to eat, rest and hydrate ourselves, we left a gas station near Rosamond to ride the final 30 miles to Red Rocks Canyon State Park. The sun was already behind the massive mountains to the west, and we rode until well after dark. We cruised in the middle of the night on the suspiciously busy desert highway; no street lights, no moon, and a very thin shoulder. We rode on like this for 25 miles.
Sometimes I would take a long sloping turn out into the middle of the midnight highway, illuminated only by my small bike light and those of my companions. I would ride as fast as I could, gazing out toward the millions of stars that comprise the Milky Way. I was trying my best to make something else of the seemingly endless, and very dangerous 20 mile ride to camp. It worked.
by Cody William Smith
instagram | flickr | prints
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Between Lone Pine, CA and Red Rock Canyon State Park
These are photographs from my recent 475-mile bicycle tour from Reno, NV to Los Angeles.
It was a hot, bright day in Lone Pine, and we needed to ride 90 miles to our next checkpoint. This beats the distance covered on any other day of the trip by about 20 miles. The land was flat, which would have been nice, if it weren’t for the 15-25mph head wind fighting us the entire way. It was an exhausting battle for the next 60 miles.
by Cody William Smith
instagram | flickr | prints
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Between Lone Pine, CA and Red Rock Canyon State Park
These are photographs from my recent 475-mile bicycle tour from Reno, NV to Los Angeles.
It was a hot, bright day in Lone Pine, and we needed to ride 90 miles to our next checkpoint. This beats the distance covered on any other day of the trip by about 20 miles. The land was flat, which would have been nice, if it weren’t for the 15-25mph head wind fighting us the entire way. It was an exhausting battle for the next 60 miles.
by Cody William Smith
instagram | flickr | prints
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Lone Pine Campground, Mt. Whitney, California
This week I’m posting photographs from my 475-mile bicycle tour from Reno, NV to Los Angeles.
Here’s Jason on top of a boulder, surveying Mt. Whitney from our camp site on the morning of the 5th day.
I happen to be at the summit of Mt. Whitney (or very near it) at this exact moment (10:30am, 06/26). I’m shooting extensively with my Hasselblad 500cm and Yashica; I hope to bring back some good stuff.
by Cody William Smith
instagram | flickr | prints
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Somewhere outside Bishop, California
This week I’m posting photographs from my 475-mile bicycle tour from Reno, NV to Los Angeles.
Not long after our departure from the hot springs I hit a bump on the shoulder of the highway, which caused my chain to become dislodged. I fell  behind the others (Jason was way out ahead of us anyway), but I did catch up to Tim pretty quick. I came around this windy ridge to find him perched atop a large collection of boulders overlooking a green valley.
I pulled over and stood up there with him, and he explained to me he felt like he needed to stop and just look for a moment. “What’s the rush?” he asked. This is something I had been trying to explain to them from the beginning, and I was proud to stumble upon Tim enjoying a very zen moment overlooking this gorgeous valley. I admit I felt even more vindicated; as if my dragging them both to the hot springs fostered a kind of reverence for the places we were passing through. This is a feeling I know all too well, and I’m always hoping to create photographs that pass that on to others.
Enter Full View
Somewhere outside Bishop, California
This week I’m posting photographs from my 475-mile bicycle tour from Reno, NV to Los Angeles.
Not long after our departure from the hot springs I hit a bump on the shoulder of the highway, which caused my chain to become dislodged. I fell  behind the others (Jason was way out ahead of us anyway), but I did catch up to Tim pretty quick. I came around this windy ridge to find him perched atop a large collection of boulders overlooking a green valley.
I pulled over and stood up there with him, and he explained to me he felt like he needed to stop and just look for a moment. “What’s the rush?” he asked. This is something I had been trying to explain to them from the beginning, and I was proud to stumble upon Tim enjoying a very zen moment overlooking this gorgeous valley. I admit I felt even more vindicated; as if my dragging them both to the hot springs fostered a kind of reverence for the places we were passing through. This is a feeling I know all too well, and I’m always hoping to create photographs that pass that on to others.
Enter Full View
Wild Willy’s Hot Springs, Mono County, California
This week I’m posting photographs from my 475-mile bicycle tour from Reno, NV to Los Angeles.
Here are just a few more from Wild Willy’s. As I said, riding 70-miles a day is very difficult and time-consuming, especially in 100 degree head and with a 15-25mph head wind. Detours like these were unfortunately rare, so I took the opportunity to shoot as many photos as possible. Aside from that, this natural oasis and the land surrounding it is a paradise compared to the rest of the Mojave.
by Cody William Smith
instagram | flickr | prints
Enter Full View
Wild Willy’s Hot Springs, Mono County, California
This week I’m posting photographs from my 475-mile bicycle tour from Reno, NV to Los Angeles.
Here are just a few more from Wild Willy’s. As I said, riding 70-miles a day is very difficult and time-consuming, especially in 100 degree head and with a 15-25mph head wind. Detours like these were unfortunately rare, so I took the opportunity to shoot as many photos as possible. Aside from that, this natural oasis and the land surrounding it is a paradise compared to the rest of the Mojave.
by Cody William Smith
instagram | flickr | prints
Enter Full View
Wild Willy’s Hot Springs, Mono County, California
This week I’m posting photographs from my 475-mile bicycle tour from Reno, NV to Los Angeles.
Here are just a few more from Wild Willy’s. As I said, riding 70-miles a day is very difficult and time-consuming, especially in 100 degree head and with a 15-25mph head wind. Detours like these were unfortunately rare, so I took the opportunity to shoot as many photos as possible. Aside from that, this natural oasis and the land surrounding it is a paradise compared to the rest of the Mojave.
by Cody William Smith
instagram | flickr | prints
Enter Full View
Wild Willy’s Hot Springs, Mono County, California
This week I’m posting photographs from my 475-mile bicycle tour from Reno, NV to Los Angeles.
We camped the second night at Mono Lake, in a park close to the water. The stars were really incredible that night, and our dehydrated dinners were not. In the middle of the night the park’s sprinkler system came on around our tent; we had foreseen this, so we covered up one of the sprinklers with a space blanket beforehand. This didn’t stop another one from waking us up at 1:30am with the sprinkler equivalent of machine-gun fire blasting the side of our tent. From a dead sleep, Jason put on his shoes, ran out of the tent, and capped the offending nozzle with a canteen.
The next morning we woke up to the sound of birds, the sight of grazing deer, and also a park ranger leading a bird-watching tour. He looked at us funny; we left pretty quick.
After about 20 miles on the road, I made my companions take a 3-mile detour to the East. We were headed to some Hot Springs, which our muscles sorely needed, and I told them if they didn’t want to go they could continue on without me. 70 miles a day is too far on a bike. It doesn’t leave you any time to have fun and enjoy your surroundings. So it was really important for me to stop at this one great place.
After that, I also forced Tim and Jason to walk their heavy bikes a mile and a half on a dirt road to the springs. At this point, they both completely hated my guts and thought it was all bullshit, but of course they said nothing. I led on, not caring how they felt.
In a perfect “told you so” moment, we hopped into the springs (which felt incredible) and they both immediately forgot about being mad at me.
by Cody William Smith
instagram | flickr | prints
Enter Full View
Wild Willy’s Hot Springs, Mono County, California
This week I’m posting photographs from my 475-mile bicycle tour from Reno, NV to Los Angeles.
We camped the second night at Mono Lake, in a park close to the water. The stars were really incredible that night, and our dehydrated dinners were not. In the middle of the night the park’s sprinkler system came on around our tent; we had foreseen this, so we covered up one of the sprinklers with a space blanket beforehand. This didn’t stop another one from waking us up at 1:30am with the sprinkler equivalent of machine-gun fire blasting the side of our tent. From a dead sleep, Jason put on his shoes, ran out of the tent, and capped the offending nozzle with a canteen.
The next morning we woke up to the sound of birds, the sight of grazing deer, and also a park ranger leading a bird-watching tour. He looked at us funny; we left pretty quick.
After about 20 miles on the road, I made my companions take a 3-mile detour to the East. We were headed to some Hot Springs, which our muscles sorely needed, and I told them if they didn’t want to go they could continue on without me. 70 miles a day is too far on a bike. It doesn’t leave you any time to have fun and enjoy your surroundings. So it was really important for me to stop at this one great place.
After that, I also forced Tim and Jason to walk their heavy bikes a mile and a half on a dirt road to the springs. At this point, they both completely hated my guts and thought it was all bullshit, but of course they said nothing. I led on, not caring how they felt.
In a perfect “told you so” moment, we hopped into the springs (which felt incredible) and they both immediately forgot about being mad at me.
by Cody William Smith
instagram | flickr | prints
Enter Full View
Wild Willy’s Hot Springs, Mono County, California
This week I’m posting photographs from my 475-mile bicycle tour from Reno, NV to Los Angeles.
We camped the second night at Mono Lake, in a park close to the water. The stars were really incredible that night, and our dehydrated dinners were not. In the middle of the night the park’s sprinkler system came on around our tent; we had foreseen this, so we covered up one of the sprinklers with a space blanket beforehand. This didn’t stop another one from waking us up at 1:30am with the sprinkler equivalent of machine-gun fire blasting the side of our tent. From a dead sleep, Jason put on his shoes, ran out of the tent, and capped the offending nozzle with a canteen.
The next morning we woke up to the sound of birds, the sight of grazing deer, and also a park ranger leading a bird-watching tour. He looked at us funny; we left pretty quick.
After about 20 miles on the road, I made my companions take a 3-mile detour to the East. We were headed to some Hot Springs, which our muscles sorely needed, and I told them if they didn’t want to go they could continue on without me. 70 miles a day is too far on a bike. It doesn’t leave you any time to have fun and enjoy your surroundings. So it was really important for me to stop at this one great place.
After that, I also forced Tim and Jason to walk their heavy bikes a mile and a half on a dirt road to the springs. At this point, they both completely hated my guts and thought it was all bullshit, but of course they said nothing. I led on, not caring how they felt.
In a perfect “told you so” moment, we hopped into the springs (which felt incredible) and they both immediately forgot about being mad at me.
by Cody William Smith
instagram | flickr | prints
Enter Full View
Devil’s Gate Pass, California
This week I’m posting photographs from my 475-mile bicycle tour from Reno, NV to Los Angeles.
Upon arriving in Bridgeport, sometime around 3pm, we were all pretty well exhausted. However, I have to say I was definitely feeling triumphant after conquering the day’s first difficult climb. We ate at a restaurant, relaxed a moment, and resupplied for the last trial of the second day.
This last segment would be the trip’s most difficult ascent; a 10-mile ride with over 2000ft in elevation gain to Conway Summit which quickly turns into a steep descent all the way into Mono Basin.
Jason, on a fixed gear, was feeling totally destroyed. I followed behind him closely the whole way up, succeeding in my personal goal of not changing gears once the entire time. We neared the summit around sunset; the sun’s rays lit just the tops of the trees in the beautiful, untouched aspen grove far below us.
We all spent a few moments at the top, reveling in our victory over the mountains before riding down into the valley and finding ourselves a place to sleep.
by Cody William Smith
instagram | flickr | prints
Enter Full View
Devil’s Gate Pass, California
This week I’m posting photographs from my 475-mile bicycle tour from Reno, NV to Los Angeles.
Upon arriving in Bridgeport, sometime around 3pm, we were all pretty well exhausted. However, I have to say I was definitely feeling triumphant after conquering the day’s first difficult climb. We ate at a restaurant, relaxed a moment, and resupplied for the last trial of the second day.
This last segment would be the trip’s most difficult ascent; a 10-mile ride with over 2000ft in elevation gain to Conway Summit which quickly turns into a steep descent all the way into Mono Basin.
Jason, on a fixed gear, was feeling totally destroyed. I followed behind him closely the whole way up, succeeding in my personal goal of not changing gears once the entire time. We neared the summit around sunset; the sun’s rays lit just the tops of the trees in the beautiful, untouched aspen grove far below us.
We all spent a few moments at the top, reveling in our victory over the mountains before riding down into the valley and finding ourselves a place to sleep.
by Cody William Smith
instagram | flickr | prints
Enter Full View
Devil’s Gate Pass, California
This week I’m posting photographs from my 475-mile bicycle tour from Reno, NV to Los Angeles.
Upon arriving in Bridgeport, sometime around 3pm, we were all pretty well exhausted. However, I have to say I was definitely feeling triumphant after conquering the day’s first difficult climb. We ate at a restaurant, relaxed a moment, and resupplied for the last trial of the second day.
This last segment would be the trip’s most difficult ascent; a 10-mile ride with over 2000ft in elevation gain to Conway Summit which quickly turns into a steep descent all the way into Mono Basin.
Jason, on a fixed gear, was feeling totally destroyed. I followed behind him closely the whole way up, succeeding in my personal goal of not changing gears once the entire time. We neared the summit around sunset; the sun’s rays lit just the tops of the trees in the beautiful, untouched aspen grove far below us.
We all spent a few moments at the top, reveling in our victory over the mountains before riding down into the valley and finding ourselves a place to sleep.
by Cody William Smith
instagram | flickr | prints
Enter Full View
Devil’s Gate Pass, California
This week I’m posting photographs from my 475-mile bicycle tour from Reno, NV to Los Angeles.
Upon arriving in Bridgeport, sometime around 3pm, we were all pretty well exhausted. However, I have to say I was definitely feeling triumphant after conquering the day’s first difficult climb. We ate at a restaurant, relaxed a moment, and resupplied for the last trial of the second day.
This last segment would be the trip’s most difficult ascent; a 10-mile ride with over 2000ft in elevation gain to Conway Summit which quickly turns into a steep descent all the way into Mono Basin.
Jason, on a fixed gear, was feeling totally destroyed. I followed behind him closely the whole way up, succeeding in my personal goal of not changing gears once the entire time. We neared the summit around sunset; the sun’s rays lit just the tops of the trees in the beautiful, untouched aspen grove far below us.
We all spent a few moments at the top, reveling in our victory over the mountains before riding down into the valley and finding ourselves a place to sleep.
by Cody William Smith
instagram | flickr | prints
Enter Full View
Devil’s Gate Pass, California
This week I’m posting photographs from my 475-mile bicycle tour from Reno, NV to Los Angeles.
Upon arriving in Bridgeport, sometime around 3pm, we were all pretty well exhausted. However, I have to say I was definitely feeling triumphant after conquering the day’s first difficult climb. We ate at a restaurant, relaxed a moment, and resupplied for the last trial of the second day.
This last segment would be the trip’s most difficult ascent; a 10-mile ride with over 2000ft in elevation gain to Conway Summit which quickly turns into a steep descent all the way into Mono Basin.
Jason, on a fixed gear, was feeling totally destroyed. I followed behind him closely the whole way up, succeeding in my personal goal of not changing gears once the entire time. We neared the summit around sunset; the sun’s rays lit just the tops of the trees in the beautiful, untouched aspen grove far below us.
We all spent a few moments at the top, reveling in our victory over the mountains before riding down into the valley and finding ourselves a place to sleep.
by Cody William Smith
instagram | flickr | prints
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Toiyabe National Forest, California
This week I’m posting photographs from my 475-mile bicycle tour from Reno, NV to Los Angeles.
Our goal for the end of Day 2 was Mono Lake, but the checkpoint in-between Topaz Lake and Mono is a small town by the name of Bridgeport. I don’t think any of us were aware that what lie between us and Bridgeport was more than 38 miles of riding uphill, through the mountainous forest, on the thin shoulder of a very windy section of highway. It went on, and on, and on, seemingly forever.
At this point I feel like I should mention that my friend Jason rode this entire trip on a fixed gear Bianchi (essentially out-badassing Tim and I from the very start), and during this section he was 30-45 minutes ahead of us by the time we caught up. He is a champion.
by Cody William Smith
instagram | flickr | prints
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Topaz Lake, Nevada
This week I’m posting photographs from my 475-mile bicycle tour from Reno, NV to Los Angeles.
Topaz Lake is one of my favorite landmarks on the way from Reno to LA, and riding along it’s edge wasn’t at all a bad start to our Saturday morning. Our goal for the day was Mono Lake; nearly 70 miles away. Little did we know, we were in for what was probably the single most difficult ride of the entire trip.
by Cody William Smith
instagram | flickr | prints
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